How tight is the violinist analogy?

The analogy also fails because it applies to rape victims and not cases of pregnancy where the man and woman have had consensual sex. Due to the fact that rape cases only make up about 1% of abortions the violinist analogy is not a very suitable one for the majority of pregnancies. In fairness, Thomson provides a burglar analogy, but critiquing this is not the purpose of this essay.

Exploring The Extent of Thomson’s Violinist Analogy

The Violinist Analogy relates to abortion, because the violinist’s life is dependent on

Questioning the Thomson’s Violinist Analogy

But in this Hedonist version of the violinist analogy, does the violinist have the right to use your body? No, he does not. You are responsible for the violinist’s existence, but you are not responsible for his neediness, given that he exist. You’re not responsible for his neediness because there was no way you could have engaged in the pleasurable activity without causing the violinist to exist at this time. But if that’s right, then this same line of reasoning applies to a pregnancy that is the result of voluntary sex. She is responsible for the existence of the fetus, but is not responsible for the neediness of the fetus, given that it exists.

Analysis of the Judith Thomson’s violinist analogy

Judith Thomsons, who is the abortion defender, argues that in some cases abortion is morally justifiable especially when it comes to rape cases. However, she does not support abortion or agree that it is always permissible. Thomsons believes that in case the woman has been raped and impregnated, it is justifiable to terminate the pregnancy if only that pregnancy threatens the mother’s life. In order to help people understand the ethical dilemmas behind abortion, Thomsons employs diverse stories especially the violinist analogy in order to provide a clear justification of abortion for rape cases. Following the violinist analogy of Thomson in proving that abortion is right, I agree that her argument for abortion on rape cases would work.

Thomson's Violinist Analogy Shows That Abortion is Morally Permissible
3. What conclusion regarding the rights of the fetus, the rightsof the mother, and the moral permissibility of abortion does Thomson drawbased on the violinist analogy?The violinist analogy suggests that a mother has no more responsibility for the welfare of her child than she has to a total stranger. McDonagh's view is even worse. She argues the child is not merely a stranger, but a violent assailant the mother needs to ward off in self-defense.
Judith Thomson’s ‘Violinist Analogy,’ Normative & Coercive Pregnancies, and the Weight of Consent

Check out the online debate Thomson's Violinist Analogy for Abortion

Perhaps the most forceful objection is that of bodily integrity. In the analogy one must only unplug themselves in order to be free from the violinist whereas, in the case of abortion, one is causing (or allowing) bodily harm to the unborn. If we consider the analogy again but replace unplugging with cutting up, poisoning or beheading him then our moral intuition leads us to a different conclusion. Now instead of simply unplugging ourselves we are causing bodily harm to this unfortunate violinist. In this case the death is due to deliberate harm rather than his own illness. The strength of the violinist analogy rests on the manner of which the musician dies. Abortion is a poor comparison to unplugging oneself. For instance one type of abortion is a suction curettage which is common first trimester. The mum's cervix is dilated, and then a cannula (a hollow plastic tube connected to a pump) is inserted. The unborn is then "dislodged and sucked into the tube- either whole or in pieces." (Life, 1999). It appears Thomson quite grossly fails to compare abortion to "unplugging". The regular abortion procedures plainly involve a direct attack on the body of the unborn. (Kaczor, 2011).

I conclude that the objection made by Wilcox fails to discredit the violinist analogy.

violinist analogy Archives - The Federalist

Do mothers have the right to intentionally kill their offspring even though they are human beings with moral status and the right to life? I believe that the violinist analogy and the bodily rights argument that it illustrates fail for a number of reasons, which I will discuss in the following sections. I also believe that we can demonstrate that a mother’s right to control her own body does not override her obligation to sustain her unborn child’s body.

I. Thomson’s Violinist Analogy

Defusing the Violinist Analogy

The analogy also fails because it applies to rape victims and not cases of pregnancy where the man and woman have had consensual sex. Due to the fact that rape cases only make up about 1% of abortions the violinist analogy is not a very suitable one for the majority of pregnancies. In fairness, Thomson provides a burglar analogy, but critiquing this is not the purpose of this essay.